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McGill Law Application HELP


lawstudent2001
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lawstudent2001
  • Applicant

Hi there! 

I'm really looking for advice on my McGill Law application for 2023 entry. I received my LSAT score of 156 today, this is lower than my average PT score of 160. On LSAC, I have the option to cancel the score- if I do, I wouldn't need to declare it to McGill right? I'm considering this as McGill is my absolute top choice for law school. I pursued my bachelor's degree at Sciences Po Paris in France, my converted GPA is 3.7, and I have volunteered both in my university and in my local community throughout my undergraduate degree. I also played soccer and held a part-time job, plus I've already studied in French so am fully bilingual.

Should I cancel my LSAT score and put all my eggs in the basket of McGill? How will admissions perceive a cancelled LSAT score, particularly from an Ontarian who should be applying to other universities that require it. The reality is after living aboard, I only want to pursue McGill's dual law degree so I have the option to return to France if I so choose. I'm thinking for the application I can indicate that I am considering LLM programs in Europe so it doesn't appear that I'm only considering McGIll (although I am haha). Worst case, McGill rejects me and I retake the LSAT for the next cycle. I should mention since I'm currently in Europe, the next available exam is in January, which is too late for McGill and not really feasible with my workload.

Thank you for reading and please let me know if you have any advice!!

Merci:)  

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Whist
  • Law Student

A cancelled score won't harm your chances in and of itself (aside from, obviously, if you applied somewhere that required a score on file and you didn't retake). McGill would see you have a cancelled score but that's it. They're pretty unpredictable and have routinely rejected high stats applicants, although it's a solid bet that a 156 isn't going to do you favours. Even if you didn't cancel, a 156 and a 3.7 isn't great chances for getting into places other than McGill either. Your LSAT would need to be better. It is quite normal to not do as well on the official thing as in PTs, especially with the nerves of the first try. 

I'm not sure what you mean by "should be applying elsewhere." There is no should - you apply where you want to go, even if that's only one school. Don't lie to admissions about pursuing an LLM, that's silly and doesn't boost how you'd appear to adcoms.  

Is there a reason you don't want to pursue a law degree in France directly? I don't have an in-depth understanding of it, but there's an agreement between France and Quebec where French lawyers can practice there in certain conditions. 

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lawstudent2001
  • Applicant

Thank you so much for your response! I am interested in the common law system as well and do want to study both, in addition I would like to return to Canada for a few years just to live closer to family, thus I'm not seriously considering programs in France. Great advice, I will worry less about appearances and just apply to where I want to go. I'll cancel my score as well, thanks again!

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WiseGhost
  • Law Student

Since you are bilingual, want exposure to common law, and would like to keep the option of returning to France in the future, UdeM and other civil law schools in Quebec could be an option. For example, UdeM students can do an LLB/JD with Osgoode if they tack on an extra year of study. You also wouldn't need an LSAT score to apply!

 

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Renerik
  • Law Student
2 hours ago, WiseGhost said:

For example, UdeM students can do an LLB/JD with Osgoode if they tack on an extra year of study

WiseGhost is right, and there are many more options for civil law graduates to receive a JD/LLB after completing their civil law degree. 

Off the top of my head, these schools have one-year programs to upgrade a civil law degree into a JD/LLB:
- Dalhousie
- Université de Moncton
- UOttawa (Their 1-year national program lets a common law graduate upgrade to civil law and vice versa)
- UVic

To answer your original question, I'd opt for deleting the 156 from your record. If you're gunning for McGill it lowers your candidature as a whole.

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