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Currently in a Master's degree and want to apply this coming cycle...curious to know what you think...


lawsandteas

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lawsandteas
  • Applicant

finished my undergrad with a CGPA: 3.70, L2: 3.91.

ill have a master's degree under my belt soon.

I have work experience in a legal setting.

I have many extracurriculars from my undergrad as an executive in multiple clubs, many community-based initiatives working alongside a diverse background of people, scholarships and awards, including nationally acclaimed awards.

My only issue is the LSAT. I seem to be sitting in the 150s. I have a learning disability that affects my performance on standardized tests.
To score a 155 would be my dream. 

I score around 152-153 consistently.

Comments are welcome, please! Let me know what you think.

Edited by lawsandteas
added more info
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2easy
  • Applicant

go to the LSAC website and get your family doctor to fill out an accommodation form. Just make sure to have it submitted by the accommodation deadline.

Edited by 2easy
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omigone
  • Law Student

There are multiple things you can do to maximize your chances of getting in, none of which are mutually exclusive. 

1) Try a different LSAT study resource. Are you more of a visual learner than someone who excels with long LSAT books? Maybe 7sage would be a great option to look into (paid) or free LSAT videos from KhanAcademy. If you haven't tried the LSAT books out, there are some from PowerScore that are useful

2) Apply for accommodations for the LSAT. If your main grievances lie with the actual test taking process and not the content (let's say you're scoring 160+ at home but score a 150+ on test day) you can apply for accommodations. While the LSAT is still remote, there are some accommodations like extra time and longer breaks that may be useful

3) Take advantage of schools with "access" applications. I can't remember all schools off by heart, but Osgoode has a part B of the application where you can detail equity related issues, including how a learning disability may have affected your LSAT score. A 150 may be a bit on the low side for admission to osgoode even with a Part B, but it's worth a shot at schools that have a hollistic application process. 

I'm happy to expand on any of these points! You have a great GPA and the Masters helps in your application too. Clearly, you are capable for law school and the challenges that come with it. Sometimes, all it may take is a tweaking of study strategy to play into your own strengths that helps improve your score. That's what worked for me and it finally "clicked". 

Best of luck!

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luckycharm
On 5/11/2023 at 11:31 PM, lawsandteas said:

finished my undergrad with a CGPA: 3.70, L2: 3.91.

ill have a master's degree under my belt soon.

I have work experience in a legal setting.

I have many extracurriculars from my undergrad as an executive in multiple clubs, many community-based initiatives working alongside a diverse background of people, scholarships and awards, including nationally acclaimed awards.

My only issue is the LSAT. I seem to be sitting in the 150s. I have a learning disability that affects my performance on standardized tests.
To score a 155 would be my dream. 

I score around 152-153 consistently.

Comments are welcome, please! Let me know what you think.

hire a privte tutor

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Chewy
  • Law School Admit
On 5/19/2023 at 3:39 PM, luckycharm said:

hire a privte tutor

If you want to spend a shit ton of money.

OP, what has your strategy been this far when it comes to studying for the LSAT?

Edited by Chewy
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lawsandteas
  • Applicant
On 5/20/2023 at 11:28 PM, Chewy said:

If you want to spend a shit ton of money.

OP, what has your strategy been this far when it comes to studying for the LSAT?

Powerscore bibles (RC, LG and LR) and I'll try to do a practice test every two weeks. Upon completion of the tests, I comb through every question and understand why I got them right/wrong. On my most recent test, I scored 158! I seem to be making progress but I hope that isn't a one-off. My weakness is RC...

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sarcasticlemon
  • Law Student

It depends on what school you want to go to! Some don't weigh the LSAT score as heavily, and having a master's degree should help. There are people who got into Lakehead this cycle with around a 151-155. If you feel like a 155 is the highest you can achieve, and you (maybe idk) qualify for access, I would say pour your energy into other things like volunteer experience and the personal statement and apply to schools that have more of a holistic process.

If you want to improve your score, many people take courses but they are expensive. A private tutor is another option.

Best of luck!

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Chewy
  • Law School Admit
1 hour ago, lawsandteas said:

Powerscore bibles (RC, LG and LR) and I'll try to do a practice test every two weeks. Upon completion of the tests, I comb through every question and understand why I got them right/wrong. On my most recent test, I scored 158! I seem to be making progress but I hope that isn't a one-off. My weakness is RC...

Here's my recommendation:

  • Get 7Sage and go through its curriculum. The benefit to doing the go-at-your-own-pace course online compared to the Bibles is that you can see the analytics of which question types you're having issues with and hone in on those. You can get a monthly plan which is still pretty cost-effective compared to other classes and tutors. Seriously, you don't need a tutor. 
  • Do a practice test every week in test-like conditions. Set the room up as if you're writing the official LSAT. Time yourself, take the break at the proper time, and go through the motions. This will help overcome test anxiety the more you become comfortable with it. 
  • If you have a learning disability, apply for accommodations. There's no shame in that. Better to apply now and see what happens. 
  • I strongly disagree with @sarcasticlemon. Except for some access applications, schools really only care about your GPA and LSAT. You have an awesome cGPA that will suffice for any law school in Canada. Don't leave your application up to chance by focusing on other areas in hopes that it may mitigate a poor LSAT. For the most part, it won't. Schools, even those holistic in their approach, want to see competitive scores. There may very well be those who are admitted with 150/151 scores, but they aren't anywhere close to the norm, and you shouldn't settle for that. Volunteering somewhere for 6 months won't be anywhere near as beneficial as putting more time into studying for the LSAT and raising your score by 5+ points. 

This is a good resource to help with test day mentality: https://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/the-ultimate-test-mentality-resource-list/

As for RC: https://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/reading-comprehension-webinar-skills-diagnostic-tests/

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sarcasticlemon
  • Law Student
16 minutes ago, Chewy said:

I strongly disagree with @sarcasticlemon. Except for some access applications, schools really only care about your GPA and LSAT. You have an awesome cGPA that will suffice for any law school in Canada. Don't leave your application up to chance by focusing on other areas in hopes that it may mitigate a poor LSAT. For the most part, it won't. Schools, even those holistic in their approach, want to see competitive scores. There may very well be those who are admitted with 150/151 scores, but they aren't anywhere close to the norm, and you shouldn't settle for that. Volunteering somewhere for 6 months won't be anywhere near as beneficial as putting more time into studying for the LSAT and raising your score by 5+ points.

I just wanted to provide them with some hope and other options, in case raising the score doesn't work out, and they can't apply access 🙂 of course the higher the LSAT the more competitive they will be, I didn't mean to imply that a 150 range score is competitive. It just isnt a "all hope is lost" situation. Theres still a chance at some schools.

Edited by sarcasticlemon
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